Public Charge

On Oct. 11, the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California temporarily blocked the federal government’s changes to the “public charge” rule, after hearing arguments from the state of California, Santa Clara County and San Francisco, along with health care, legal services and immigrant organizations.
Californians, stand up for immigrants targeted by ‘public charge’ rule
October 2019
Commentary
News
Over the last several years, the EITC Funders Network has partnered with Grantmakers Concerned with Immigrants and Refugees (GCIR) on issues at the intersection of tax credit access, immigration status, and racial and ethnic equity. Although the EITC is no longer on the list of benefits and services under the recently issued public charge rule, the actual and potential impact of the rule on low-income immigrant families remains devastating. EITC recently spoke with Kevin Douglas, Director of National Programs at GCIR, about the latest developments, how the public charge rule fits into the larger picture of recent government actions, and the ways funders can engage.
Kevin Douglas, GCIR Director of National Programs
September 2019
Blog Post
News
The Trump administration has launched its most far-reaching attack on immigrants to date in the guise of a seemingly innocuous regulatory change: the revised “public charge” rule. When the new rule goes into effect on October 15, barring delays due to litigation, immigrants accessing programs that help them meet basic needs, such as food, housing, and health care, can be denied a green card, and individuals deemed likely to use these programs can be denied admission to the United States.
September 2019
Blog Post
News
Find all program-related materials for the webinar, "A Threat to Health and Wellbeing: Public Charge's Expected Impact and How Philanthropy Can Respond" here, including presentation and recording.
September 2019
Program Materials
Resource
Read the five main takeaways from Urban Institute's research into the effects of the public charge rule, which radically overhauls policy to allow immigrants who use certain public programs to be denied visas or permanent residency.
Urban Institute logo, which features Urban in capital blue bold letters above Institute in smaller black capital letters over a square dot grid. Accompanies their blog post, Five Ways the “Public Charge” Rule Is Affecting Immigrants in America.
August 2019
Blog Post
News
Philanthropy California stands with advocates and communities across the country in our unwavering opposition to the public charge rule.
Philanthropy CA logo, which features a green, blue, and orange circle next to their name in blue letters. Accompanies their statement, Standing with Immigrant Families: Philanthropy California Opposes Final Public Charge Rules and Encourages Philanthropy to Take Action.
August 2019
Statement
News
The public-charge rule issued this week by the Trump administration will have profound effects on legal admissions to the United States and on use of public benefits by millions of legal noncitizens and the U.S. citizens with whom they live.
Migration Policy Institute logo, which features two triangular leg like shapes on a green square background with their acronym to the right and name across the bottom. Accompanies their commentary, Millions Will Feel Chilling Effects of U.S. Public-Charge Rule That Is Also Likely to Reshape Legal Immigration.
August 2019
Commentary
News
Recent Urban Institute survey data show that heightened immigration-related fears and concerns are shaping immigrant families’ daily lives.
The Urban Institute logo, which features their name spelled out, the first word in larger blue letters, the second in smaller black letters, over a dotted grid pattern. Accompanies their blog post, How Uncertainty Surrounding the “Public Charge” Rule Leads to Hardship for Immigrant Families.
August 2019
Blog Post
News
This brief and funding recommendations considers the implications of the 'public charge' rule and how philanthropy can mount an effective immediate and long-term response.
Two women with young girls on their laps, one with a pacifier, awaiting doctor's appointments in an office. Posted to accompany GCIR's brief and funding recommendations, Protecting Families and Advancing Belonging: How Philanthropy Can Answer Threats to the Well-Being of Immigrants.
August 2019
Funding Recommendations, Issue Brief
Resource
The administration's justification for the 'public charge' rule assumes immigrants of modest means are harmful to our nation and our economy. Research shows the opposite is true.
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities logo, which features their name spelled out in blue and a blue chart in the lefthand corner with an upward sloping white line. Accompanies their issue brief, Immigrants Contribute Greatly to U.S. Economy, Despite Administration’s “Public Charge” Rule Rationale.
August 2019
Issue Brief
Resource

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