Public Charge

National Immigration Law Center (NILC) logo
August 2020
Issue Brief
Resource
California has moved proactively to support immigrant families in response to restrictive federal immigration and safety net policies, but policies like the new “public charge” rule still pose risks, especially in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. The new rule significantly expands the criteria for determining whether applicants for permanent residency, or green cards, may be denied based on past or potential use of government benefit programs.
May 2020
Issue Brief
Resource
The PIF Campaign recommends against proactively connecting coronavirus and public charge. In light of efforts by anti-immigrant activists to link immigration with infectious disease, PIF prefers to focus communication elsewhere.
March 2020
Talking Points
Resource
Over the last several years, the EITC Funders Network has partnered with Grantmakers Concerned with Immigrants and Refugees (GCIR) on issues at the intersection of tax credit access, immigration status, and racial and ethnic equity. Although the EITC is no longer on the list of benefits and services under the recently issued public charge rule, the actual and potential impact of the rule on low-income immigrant families remains devastating. EITC recently spoke with Kevin Douglas, Director of National Programs at GCIR, about the latest developments, how the public charge rule fits into the larger picture of recent government actions, and the ways funders can engage.
Kevin Douglas, GCIR Director of National Programs
September 2019
Blog Post
News
The Trump administration has launched its most far-reaching attack on immigrants to date in the guise of a seemingly innocuous regulatory change: the revised “public charge” rule. When the new rule goes into effect on October 15, barring delays due to litigation, immigrants accessing programs that help them meet basic needs, such as food, housing, and health care, can be denied a green card, and individuals deemed likely to use these programs can be denied admission to the United States.
September 2019
President's Message
News
This brief and funding recommendations considers the implications of the 'public charge' rule and how philanthropy can mount an effective immediate and long-term response.
Two women with young girls on their laps, one with a pacifier, awaiting doctor's appointments in an office. Posted to accompany GCIR's brief and funding recommendations, Protecting Families and Advancing Belonging: How Philanthropy Can Answer Threats to the Well-Being of Immigrants.
August 2019
Funding Recommendations, Issue Brief
Resource
A statement by multiple Chicago-based foundations denouncing the Trump administration's proposed changes to the "public charge" rule. 
December 2018
Statement
News
The Boston Foundation issued a statement expressing their opposition to the proposed changes to the "public charge" rule. 
The Boston Foundation Criticizes Proposed Rule Change on Immigrants and “Public Charge”
September 2018
Statement
News
A summary of some of the more important changes in the proposed "public charge" rule and how CLINIC plans to respond.
September 2018
Analysis, Funding Recommendations
Resource
This month’s edition of GCIR’s Monthly Immigration Policy Calls will provide an in-depth review of this regulation, explore the meaning of ‘public charge,’ and highlight how a campaign,  “Protecting Immigrant Families, Advancing Our Future,” is uniting a cross-sector of key national, state, and local level organizations to protect and defend access to health care, nutrition programs, public services, and economic supports for immigrants and their families.
April 2018
Monthly Immigration Policy Call
A Guide to the New 'Public Charge' Rules: What is Public Charge and How Can Organizations and Funders Respond to Support Family and Child Well-Being
Program
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